What’s My Story?

9

This is a list of my original fiction on The Red Cedar:

The Nain Rouge of Detroit, retold

The Flying Canoe, la Chasse-Galerie, retold

The Wild North: Le Loup Garou, retold

The Direction of Flight

This in an index of posts I have written about reading:

The Miracles of Mary by Bridget Curran
The Orenda and The Jesuit Relations by Joseph Boyden
Bird Cloud by Annie Proulx
The Painted Drum by Louise Erdrich
The White And the Gold by Thomas Costain
Visions of Gerard by Jack Kerouac
Out Stealing Horses by Per Petterson
The Knocker on Death’s Door by Ellis Peters
A Bibliophile Catalogs His Home Library
A Tower of Books

This is an index of posts I have written on mysticism or spirituality.

Surface to Air
I am a Terrible Tour Guide
The Sacred in Space and Time
Die Harder
Bringing the Mystery Home
Complexity in Ten Words or Less: Karen Armstrong on Compassion at the World Congress of Faiths

This is an index of blog posts from an earlier blog of mine, Medieval Mystics, that I wrote as a way to complete two seminars I took at the Spertus Institute of Jewish Studies in Chicago in 2011. I had begun a doctoral program but withdrew after the first two seminars. These blog posts are synopses of readings from the seminars.

The Shekinah in the Rabbinic Worldview

Sexuality, Kabbalah, Ritual and Meaning in Jewish Tradition
Rabbi Louis Jacobs, and the Alienation of Reason
Is Kabbalah a Mystery Religion?
Heaven is My Throne, and the Earth is My Footstool: Defining God’s Body
Penitence, and Trends in Scholarship
Authority, and Orhan Pamuk
Glorious Martyrs
Self-assurance and Redemption
Defining the Hasid
History and Ideology
Hasidei Ashkenaz: Myth and History
Ashkenaz: Cradle of Reform

Advertisements

9 thoughts on “What’s My Story?

  1. A FRIEND IN LOUISIANA TOLD ME ABOUT YOUR SITE HERE. DESPITE 40 YEARS OF MASS-MARKETING, MASS-MISREPRESENTATION OF THE DIVERSE FRANCOPHONE ETHNICITES LONG REPRESENTED UNDER THE LABEL OF ‘CREOLE’ OR “BORN IN THE COLONIES” WE ARE NOT ALL “CAJUN” NOR ARE ONLY BLACK FRANCOPHONES “CREOLE.” MANY OF US IN “ACADIANA” -CREATED BY LEGAL FIAT IN 1971 TO COMPLIMENT THE COROLLARY OF THIS MYTHICAL ACADIAN FRENCH REGION-MOST OF THE INDIGENOUS FAMILIES IN THE UPPER FRENCH TRIANGLE OF LOUISIANA ARE NOT OF ACADIAN ORIGIN; WE ARE OF METIS-FRENCH AND NATIVE-AMERICAN, ESPECIALLY CHOCTAW, ORIGINS TO WHICH WE CAN ADD GERMANIC, SPANISH AND YES, EVEN AFRICAN POSSIBILITIES. NEITHER ARE WE ALL RACISTS. I LOOK FORWARD TO READING YOUR WORK HERE. NICE.

    • James says:

      John – Thank you so much for following my blog and writing. One of the things I’m finding as I write my blog and find myself in conversations with other folks from around the US and Canada, is that often what WE call ourselves is overwhelmed by what others call us. I’m increasingly of the mind for example that French Canadian as it is used in Michigan should really be seen as a synonym for Metis or Creole and that many of the communities French Canadians lived in should more appropriately be called creole communities. I’m curious to know more about Louisiana Creole peoples. —James

    • #NAMA says:

      The more acceptable term for “Black” Créoles is “Gens du couleur”..we didn’t become “Black” until Americanization via Napoleon.

  2. James, I couldn’t agree with you more on the point of Creole being a more precise ethnic label for these French and Indian derived people. Of course, metis is the word used by the French religious in labeling the offspring of the coureurs des bois and their Amer-indian/Canadian and French children.
    In Louisiana, four decades ago, “Cajunization” began to relabel our historic multi-racial Francophone Creole (and certainly metis!) culture implying an Acadian/Canadian mythic origin!
    Largely due to racial fears of being confused with “black” creoles (their/our relatives by plantation papas) the white Creoles of what has been relabeled “Cajun” country for four decades sought a sheepskin of guaranteed whiteness due to the binary racial order of colonial American federalism. They didn’t understand that a new democratic America was emerging and were still struggling with “passing” as white as possible. “Cajun” an artificially created term ostensibly representative of Louisiana’s Acadian/creoles was introduced and attached to everything in and out of Louisiana ever since. Chef K-Paul Prudhomme (half LaFleur on his mother’s side and therefore, a cousin) subscribed to the new economic trend encouraging white Creoles to embrace the new synthetic label of “Cajun.” Obviously, he was of French Creole descent on both sides of his parents. But, like many, he was POOR. “Cajunism” was created simultaneously to ostensibly aggrandize a culture and people who refused participation in the larger American and Creole cultures of their new destination/home.
    They feared and resented any kind of “education’ and therefore, according to American writer and American agent, George Washinton Cable, equated Creoles with this perceived anathema! Creoles followed French court etiquette and social order. The Acadians were not adherents to social proprieties to be kind. (I am 1/4 descent Acadian so I mean no animosity to the Acadians, mind you. I simply speak to the realities of the time, the people and the situation of that time.)
    “Cajun” would also quite conveniently allow the insecure Creoles to maintain their historic Catholic identity, social and culinary and linguistic traditions-more or less!
    Thus was “Cajun” Louisiana born.
    Many white Creoles, however, did not and would never mutate into “Cajuns” and we’re still here resisting and proclaiming historical reality and step-by-step restoring historical reality to contemporary history and reality!
    My new book, Louisiana’s French Creole Culinary & Linguistic Traditions: Facts vs Fiction Before and Since Cajunization addresses these issues head on. It is also one of the first books in ages to effectively explain the several forms of French-related dialects/languages still present in Louisiana. Additionally, it traces the true roots of our historic multi-racial culture via its culinary and linguistic traditions. It has been and continues to be well received; although some (you guessed it) among the self-styled “cajuns” refuse to deal with it.
    It is a pleasure to chat with you, but I will need to sign off for now. Feel free to visit my website at: courtableauhouse.com This is the former home of my Alabama French/Choctaw/coureur des bois grandson’s home. My North American paternal ancestor, Jacques andre’ dit laFleur was the chief interpreter for the high chief of the Choctaw nation at Ft. Toulouse, Alabama in the early 1700s. He knew Bienville who spoke the same patois of old Colonial French/Choctaw Creole which has been misnomered “Cajun” French and is now relabeled “Louisiana French” today! (Whew!) These people (Cajunists) inadvertently created a real tar baby for themselves because of their deceitfulness and greed which motivated the creation myth of an “Acadian cultural base” and resulted in the mass-information which has certainly wrought a multi-million dollar tourism, but at the expense of historical reality, cultural and ethnic misrepresentation and deceitful and illogical explanations
    which have all come back to haunt them due to genealogical and historical resources to say nothing of the internet and the jewel of independent scholarship!
    A bientot mon ami! -John laFleur II, Louisiana Creole Gourmet/Educator/Independent Scholar/linguist (Sure looks impressive! 🙂

  3. Pierre Martel says:

    Wow!!! Just found your blog! you are a fresh voice in the french/englisg fight for us in Quebec. Keep the good work!

    • James says:

      Thank you Pierre- I love getting comments and thoughts from folks in Quebec. We’re one people and one culture. I’m so glad I can be of some support across the border. Thank you for reading!

      • What really bothers me is that there exist no unitarian name for all French Americans (continent), neither an unitarian flag. We should create an unitarian name to encompass Québec, Acadia, Louisiana, Métis, and all the various diasporas of these populations, like la Vieille Mine (Missouri), Détroit, Floribec, Franco-Americans of New England, Saint-Louis, etc. Geographically, we all are French America, but the US’ silly idea of taking a monopoly on that name makes everything complicated. For a flag, the Unilys could be a good proposal, but some might find it too québéco-centric. But bleu is the color of French, white was the color of all French flags in New France and a gold lys would be too manarchist. I do not think that a French American flag should remind of the French tricolor, because it has no meaning in America. Red and blue are Paris’ colours, used on revolutionnary cockades, and white, the color of the French flag before the Revolution (Kingdom and Constitutionnal Kingdom).

  4. May God, King, Queens (of all types!) 🙂 and all men of good will continue to fight for honest intellectual, cultural and historical truth!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: